Will you become an eclipse chaser?


We’re 30 days away

The Aug. 21 solar eclipse experience may trigger a new passion for you to pursue. Umbraphiles are eclipse chasers who travel the world to experience the awe of the shadow. Some chasers tally the minutes spent in totality. If you’re one of the lucky million or so in Oregon who squeezes into the 87-mile-wide totality path, you can bag 2 minutes to 2 minutes 10 seconds and be on your way toward a lifetime goal. You never know; how about a trip to Argentina or Chile for the next total solar eclipse July 2,  2019?

Wondering what to expect for our eclipse? Here’s a quick primer.

Total Solar Eclipse phases. Composite Solar Eclipse.

The critical viewing moments
Adapted from a description by Jim Todd – Director of Space Science Education, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry

First Contact
While wearing your approved eclipse glasses, this is the moment you’ll notice a bite out of the sun. The bite will steadily grow larger until the sun becomes a narrow crescent. Look at shadows cast on the ground from tree leaves—an amazing collection of crescents.

10-15 minutes before totality–Shadows grow sharper as daylight diminishes and an eerie quality of daylight envelops you. Shadows grow sharper. The temperature drops. Birds and other animals act as though it’s evening.

1-2 minutes before totality–Your senses scream. Something big is about to happen. Sunlight looks strangely different; it isn’t day, nor is it the night. The sky displays a color gradient, dark to the west and blue to the east.

Look to the west. Mountains or clouds in the distance turn dark. The moon’s shadow has met them and is coming quickly toward you.

Look at the ground, especially white surfaces. You may see the elusive shadow bands that flicker and dance and somewhat resemble the refractions of sunlight on the bottom of a swimming pool.

Seconds before totality–You may see the very thin crescent of the sun (through your eclipse glasses) suddenly break into a thin string of beads. Baily’s Beads occur because the last remnants of sunlight are peeking through valleys and low points of the moon’s surface. The last Baily’s Bead lasts for only an instant and the breathtaking sight of this last bit of sunlight along with your first view of the corona is called the diamond ring.

Second Contact
Total eclipse begins–Now the moment has come and it is unmistakable. For probably the first time in your life, you are standing under the shadow of the moon. It is suddenly dark and there will be an audible reaction from you and others. You can take off your eclipse glasses and look at the corona with your eyes and binoculars. This is the only safe time to look at the eclipse without eclipse glasses.

Chromosphere and prominences– If you view the eclipse through binoculars (only when the Sun is completely blocked by the moon!), look for an innermost and irregular layer of deep red. This is the Sun’s chromosphere. Watch for what seem to be several licks of flame. These are solar prominences and their number and degree vary.

Stars and planets–Brighter stars and planets are visible during totality but don’t spend too much time stargazing. Focus on the eclipse

Third Contact
Total eclipse ends–
After about two minutes, the total solar eclipse ends, marked by a second diamond ring followed by Baily’s Beads. Be sure to watch this through your eclipse.

Last Contact
Partial eclipse–
Pause, reflect and celebrate with your family and friends.

 

Take a guided kayak tour with Oregon State Parks


The weather is warm and that means it’s a great time to be in the water–or at least on the water. We offer guided kayak tours at six scenic locations this summer. You can paddle on the Clackamas, Columbia or Deschutes Rivers, glide over an estuary, or drift through a freshwater marsh. Park rangers will point out the local plant and animal life and discuss the history of each area during these relaxing trips.

Parks provide the kayaks, paddles, and personal flotation devices. Please remember to bring sun protection (sunscreen, glasses and a hat), lots of water, lunch, and shoes you don’t mind getting wet. Also, dress in layers and bring a dry change of clothes.

Single or double kayaks are available and the rates range  $15-$20 for singles and $20-$40 for doubles. Kids must be at least 6 years old to take part, and children 6 to 12 must share a tandem kayak with an adult. Anyone 12 and older can rent a single kayak.

Most of the tours run in July and August, but the dates and times vary. Visit the Oregon Parks Store for more information and to register for a guided tour.

Beaver Creek at Brian Booth State Park
The slow-moving creek gives kayakers an incredible chance to appreciate the biodiversity of a healthy, wetland marsh ecosystem on this 2 1/2-hour paddle. Beaver Creek at Brian Booth State Park is on the central coast near Seal Rock

Clay Myers State Natural Area
Enjoy the Sand Lake Estuary, one of only two major estuaries in Oregon designated as natural due to little agricultural or commercial development. Several streams connect to this aquatic system that features an intertidal salt marsh, tidal channels, and forested wetlands. Including the safety and skill review, give yourself about four hours for this trip–2 1/2 hours on the water. Clay Myers State Natural Area is on the northern coast near Pacific City on the northern coast.

Milo McIver State Park
Get ready for a 2-hour, 3-mile excursion along Estacada Lake on the Clackamas River. Rangers will share their knowledge of local wildlife and the area’s logging history. A $5 day-use parking permit is required.  Milo McIver State Park is 24 miles southeast of Portland.

Rooster Rock State Park
Enjoy a 2-hour trip with incredible views of the gorge on this paddle along a channel to the Columbia River. This trip is designed for beginners and local history buffs. A $5 day-use parking permit is required. Rooster Rock State Park is 24 miles east of Portland.

Kayaking at The Cove Palisades

The Cove Palisades State Park
Take a 3-hour excursion with stunning views of the 800-foot basalt cliffs along the Deschutes River arm of Lake Billy Chinook. The interpretive staff will share info about local geology, area history, and the plants and animals of the High Desert. These trips begin in September. A $5 day-use parking permit is required.  The Cove Palisades is near Madras in central Oregon.

William Tugman State Park
Paddle along Eel Lake, a deep waterway formed by a series of geological events. The tour drifts close to the shoreline and offers a great chance to see the wide variety of flora and fauna. This tour takes about four hours including a skills review and safety orientation. William Tugman State Park is south of Reedsport on the central coast.

A private company provides stand up paddle board and kayak rentals at William Tugman. Jessie Honeyman State Park near Florence offers private pedal boat, canoe, kayak and paddle board rentals.

Celebrate the Beach Bill’s golden anniversary at the Capitol


Beach-Bill-Birthday-Bash_poster_no logos WEBThis July Oregon celebrates an important birthday, and you’re invited to the party.

Fifty years ago the Beach Bill became law, and Oregonians secured their access to all 362 miles of coastline. This was huge – Oregon became one of the first and few states to protect public beach access along the entire coastline.

In honor of this milestone, Oregon State Parks is bringing the beach to the Capitol, where the legacy of Oregon’s open beaches was secured with the signing of the bill in July of 1967. On Saturday, July 8, we’re throwing a Beach Bill Birthday Bash from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., in partnership with Oregon State Parks Foundation, the Oregon State Capitol Foundation’s Capitol History Gateway and more than 16 partnering organizations and coastal businesses.

It just one of several ways you can celebrate this landmark year. Cannon Beach, Gold Beach, Coos Bay and other coast-based organizations are also planning events to celebrate the Beach Bill. Oregonbeachparty.org has all the details.

Salem’s bash features all the coastal favorites: kites, a giant inflatable Dungeness crab, Mo’s chowder, free scoops of really creamy Tillamook ice cream, and even a giant sandbox with sand toys and hidden treasures.

Bring your beach blanket for a concert on the lawn at 11:30 a.m. featuring the debut coast-inspired album by Portland artist Slater Smith. We partnered with the indie artist in 2013 for the music video to the song “Back O’er Oregon,” which he filmed in 185 state parks. That’s 185 parks featured in just over five minutes. We were impressed. So we can’t wait to hear what he’s developed this time.

Activities for kids include kite making, beach-themed crafts, face painting and meeting JR Beaver, the Oregon State Parks’ mascot. Washed Ashore is bringing its famous 7-foot salmon Nora, sculpted from beach trash. You never knew garbage could be so elegant.

You know those pretty handmade glass floats Lincoln City hides on the beach every year? We have some of those too — 50 to be exact. Instead of hiding them, attendees can enter a raffle at the Oregon State Parks booth to win one, each engraved with a commemorative 50th anniversary stamp.

We also want you to walk away feeling a little bit smarter. Boost your beach smarts at the many booths and exhibits. Inside the Capitol, a 30-minute Oregon Public Broadcasting Beach Bill documentary will air for the duration of the event, and a special Beach Bill exhibit will be on display in the Galleria.

Visitors can take a special Beach Bill-themed Capitol tour with Beach Ranger Brian at 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., and 1:30 p.m. Weather permitting, the public can also take a tower tour to the Oregon Pioneer at 11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m.

RSVP and help us spread the word on Facebook. Questions? Call the Capitol’s Visitor Services at 503-986-1388 or visit the Capitol’s events page. Parking is free under the Capitol Mall, accessible from Chemeketa Street NE. Meters surrounding the Capitol are not enforced on weekends.

Historic Sunset Bay beach funThe people’s coast

Generations of Oregonians have enjoyed visiting the coast, but that tradition was first officially protected in 1913, when Governor Oswald West and the Oregon legislature established the state’s 362 miles of shoreline as a public highway.

Then, in the summer of 1966, the owner of a Cannon Beach hotel found a loophole in the legislation: dry sand didn’t apply. He placed large driftwood logs to block off a section of the beach to all but his guests. In response, the State Highway Commission, with Gov. Tom McCall’s support, introduced two bills in the legislature to protect all sand, wet and dry. The bills mimicked a Texas law that recognized the public’s continued use of private beach land as a permanent right.

At first, the bills had little public support and seemed destined to fail. But news stories and a well-publicized visit to Cannon Beach by Gov. McCall spread the word that Oregon’s open beaches were at risk.

Kramer_headline1_recreate

“Most people had assumed the beaches were already public and weren’t aware of the efforts at the capital until it was almost too late,” said Laurel Hillmann, Ocean Shores Specialist for Oregon State Parks. “In the end, Oregonians’ persistence saved the beach.”

The legislature passed the Beach Bill on June 7, 1967, and the governor signed it into law on July 6. The bill would “forever preserve and maintain the sovereignty of the state heretofore existing over the seashore and ocean beaches of the state…so that the public may have the free and uninterrupted use thereof.”

Though the process didn’t end there — the legislation would face many legal challenges in the years that followed — the legacy had just begun.

So take a stroll, explore your tidepools, hunt for agates, dip your toes in the sand — and know this beach is yours and mine and everyone’s, thanks to Oregonians like you.

For information on the history of the Beach Bill and other ways to celebrate this anniversary year, go to oregonbeachparty.org.