Category Archives: camping

New Oregon State Park camping rates go into effect Nov. 1, 2017


The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is raising state park camping rates by $2 for some types of campsites effective Nov. 1, 2017.

The Oregon Legislature approved the $2 increase as part of the 2017-19 Oregon Parks and Recreation Department budget.  After a public comment period in August and September, the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission approved the rate increase at its September 2017 meeting.

The rate for a typical full hookup RV site at the state’s most popular campgrounds will rise to $30 per night, and basic yurts will go from $40 to $42. Rates will also rise by the same $2 amount for deluxe yurts, basic and deluxe cabins, electric sites, and hiker-biker camping areas. Tent camping rates, now $17-$19 per night, will not change. Additional information is available at
http://bit.ly/OregonStateParksrates.

“The $2 rate increase aligns with the views expressed in past park surveys that show visitors prefer smaller rate increases on a more frequent basis than a large fee increase in the future,” says Lisa Sumption, director of OPRD.  “We do not receive tax dollars for operation of our parks. Nearly all our funding comes from visitors, a portion of RV registration dollars, and the Oregon Lottery.”

Oregon’s state parks attract 2.7 million campers and 51.5 million day visitors every year, consistently ranking in the nation’s top 10 state park systems.  OPRD last raised its camping rates in 2014, and the state park system is not funded by taxes. Visitors, voter-approved funding from the Oregon Lottery, and a share of recreational vehicle registrations fund the Oregon state park system.

Visit www.oregonstateparks.org for a list of all state parks and campgrounds.

Oregon State Parks to open 1,000 additional eclipse campsites April 19


Starting at 8 a.m. April 19, 2017, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) will open reservations for approximately 1,000 campsites for the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse. These sites are in addition to our regular campsites, most of which have been reserved since November 2016.

About two-thirds of the new sites are inside the path of totality, where visitors will see a total solar eclipse. Most of the others are within 30 miles of totality, in view of a partial eclipse. Prices range from $10 a night for a basic spot in a field or parking lot to $31 a night for an RV site with full hookups. All sites include an $8 nonrefundable reservation fee.

“We want to make this once-in-a-lifetime event available to as many campers as we can safely accommodate. That’s why we decided to add additional campsites, all at an affordable cost,” said OPRD spokesman Chris Havel.

All sites will have a three-night minimum, with check-in on Friday, Aug. 18 and check-out Monday, Aug. 21. Customers can make reservations beginning at 8 a.m. April 19 at oregonstateparks.org or reserveamerica.com or by calling the reservation line at 800-452-5687.  Questions? Call the Oregon State Parks Information Center at 1-800-551-6949, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Customers may also email their questions to park.info@oregon.gov.

OPRD is making available two types of sites: traditional campsites and temporary eclipse camping spots.

Traditional campsites, representing about a third of the total sites available, are at parks that normally offer non-reservable, “first-come, first-served” camping. These have picnic tables and fire rings, but some do not have showers. No first-come, first-served camping will be available at these parks the nights of Aug. 18-20:

  • Coast: Beachside, Carl G. Washburne (both outside the path of totality).
  • Willamette Valley: North Santiam, Cascadia (both in path of totality); Cascara Campground at Fall Creek Reservoir (outside the path of totality).
  • Central and Eastern: Farewell Bend, Unity Lake, Clyde Holliday, and Bates (all in path of totality); Cottonwood Canyon, Catherine Creek, Ukiah-Dale, Minam, Red Bridge, Hilgard Junction, Lake Owyhee and Jasper Point (all outside path of totality) .

Two-thirds of the sites are in temporary eclipse camping areas at campgrounds and day-use parks with sufficient space and facilities. These $10 and $11 per-night sites provide a place to park and camp in a parking lot or field, but little else. They do not have hookups, fire pits or picnic tables. Some are at parks without flush toilets or showers; OPRD is adding portable toilets to accommodate extra people. Visitors with reservations for a temporary eclipse site will be assigned a space on arrival at the park.

  • Coast: South Jetty at South Beach, Fogarty Creek, Driftwood Beach and Governor Patterson Memorial (all in path of totality).
  • Valleys: Silver Falls, Willamette Mission (all in path of totality); Champoeg (on the edge of totality); Milo McIver (outside path of totality).
  • Central and Eastern: Smith Rock, The Cove Palisades, Farewell Bend (in path of totality); Cottonwood Canyon (outside path of totality).

Site descriptions for all eclipse camping areas are at oregonstateparks.org, along with links to other camping and lodging options in the state. No camping will be available for anyone without a reservation in the campgrounds listed above on Aug. 18-20.

To accommodate additional campers, OPRD will place extra staff in parks in and near totality and bring in portable toilets. OPRD is also collaborating with local and state authorities on traffic, crowd control and safety.

“Transportation planners predict unprecedented traffic and crowds during the eclipse weekend, and we are planning accordingly,” Havel said. “We ask that campers plan to stay off the roads on the morning of Aug. 21 and respect any fire restrictions.”

Campfires may be prohibited, depending on wildfire danger and the weather forecast. The Oregon Department of Forestry will post any wildfire restrictions at keeporegongreen.org/current-conditions/.

The eclipse will begin at 9 a.m. and end at 11:30 a.m. on Aug. 21, 2017. The 60-mile wide path of totality–when the moon completely blocks the sun–will last for about two minutes starting at 10:15 a.m. on the coast between Newport and Lincoln City. The path of totality then sweeps through the state and on to Idaho, then runs across the United States toward South Carolina. Those outside the path of totality will see a partial eclipse. For more information about the eclipse, visit bit.ly/OregonStateParks2017Eclipse.

Free camping and fishing–make it happen


Celebrate Your Parks on State Parks Day, June 4, 20162016-State-Parks-Day

Camping is free the night of June 4 in traditional sites—full hookup (sewer, electricity and water), electrical hookup (electricity and water), and tent sites.  Parking is free June 4-5 at the 26 parks that charge a day-use parking fee.

Visitors will also be able to fish, crab and clam without a license June 4-5 for Oregon’s Free Fishing Weekend, hosted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). ODFW will offer the gear, bait and instructions at parks around the state, including Benson State Recreation Area in the Columbia River Gorge and Jessie M. Honeyman Memorial State Park and Fort Stevens State Park on the coast.

Campsite reservations may be made by calling 800-452-5687 before 5 p.m. June 3. Or, reserve online at www.oregonstateparks.org. While the campsite rental is free, an $8 nonrefundable reservation fee still applies. Of the 52 state park campgrounds, 42 take reservations.

Parks throughout the state will host activities including guided hikes—Saturday, June 4 is also National Trails Day—plus open houses, tours, special barbecues and guest appearances by J.R. Beaver, Oregon State Parks mascot.

  • Silver Falls State Park east of Salem will have free refreshments, a guided waterfall tour and its annual Foot Race Challenge, with a 5K, 6-mile and kids’ race.
  • Stub Stewart State Park west of Portland will host a volunteer work party in the morning, followed by free lunch at Hilltop Day-use Area, a guided bike ride, scavenger hunt, skins and skulls display and more.
  • See a fur trappers’ encampment at Champoeg State Heritage Area. Walk among the tents and work stations, ask questions of the interpreters and watch demonstrations of trapping, shooting, cooking and packing for the fur trade.